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DIY front brakes maintenance

Old 07-Apr-2010, 09:51 AM
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Post DIY front brakes maintenance

Recently while changing my brake pads i discovered that they were wearing uneven and looked more into it, just to find that one of the saddle pins were ceased. So i talked to a few friends who are mechanics and found out how you can fix this problem on your own.
1. Remove the brake caliber and just set it aside so that it is out of the way without disconnecting the brake line.
2. Remove brake pads.
3. Remove the saddle
4. Once you have the saddle off you have to try and get the rubber boot off of the pin that is ceased, it will be stubborn but try not to wreck it or else you have to get a new one.
5. Once you get the rubber boot off and you are unable to get the pin out with just your own strength and some vice grips then you will have to heat it up using a torch.
6. Only apply heat on the side with the ceased pin. Get it almost red hot and once it is start trying to get that pin out.
7. If you canít get it out it might be beyond repair, but if you do the hard part is over.
8. The next steps are to just clean up the pin using a wire wheel. And if you can try to clean out the hole where you insert the pin then that is recommended as well.
9. The final step is to put it all back together applying anti-cease to the pin.

I was told that itís a common problem with civics and thought that i would share my experience with the TCC because when I needed to I was unable to find any threads on it.
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 10:22 AM
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^^Very common problem. Thanks for posting this. I have and I'm sure many others have come across the same issue.

Moisture can get in the caliper slide/float pin over time and, if not properly cleaned and re-greased during servicing, causes it to rust and seize up. The caliper is unable to 'float' or move, so one pad will wear out more quickly and unevenly.

Just a few things to add:

Once you have the pin out, spray in the hole with brake cleaner and run a wire brush type pipe cleaner in the hole to try to remove as much rust as possible. Once it's as clean as you can get it, spray wd40 in there to create a bit of a moisture barrier, then put some caliper slide grease in the hole. Before you put the rubber boot back on, put the pin in and squeeze out some of the extra grease as it may prevent the pin from going in all that way. Make sure the pin slides nice and free.

Re-assemble and it should be good to go until the next brake service.

Last edited by MPR; 07-Apr-2010 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 10:32 AM
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Lmao wow thanks for catching all those mistakes lol i was just trying to post it up as fast as possible. :S damn auto correct.
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 10:44 AM
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No worries. You had the right idea. Most people just pull the caliper, slap some new pads in and put it back together without doing anything else.

At least you noticed your pads were not wearing down evenly and did something to fix it.

One other thing, I'm not sure what you meant by 'anti-seize'. If you meant the brake slide grease, then you are correct. I normally refer to anti-seize as the silver or copper stuff you brush onto bolt threads to prevent them from seizing. That which you should put on EVERY bolt you remove and put back on the car, thus, the next time everything will come appart without any trouble...lol. That type of anti-seize is not meant for caliper slide/float pins.

Last edited by MPR; 07-Apr-2010 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 10:52 AM
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ya by anti seize i meant grease, and yes i did apply grease to the bolts makes your life so much easier lol :P
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 10:53 AM
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sorry lol i applied the silver stuff to the bolts not grease :|
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 11:31 AM
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This is also applicable to the rear disc brakes. (if you have them)
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 11:43 AM
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i have a little question for you because i also have not been able to find any advice about it on these forums

i might have to replace my caliper piston, because its all dried out and when i look at it i can see that its metal on metal. but my question is, do you know if there is like a bladder behind that piston to hold the brake fluid. i know its like that on domestic cars but i've never had to fix this on a import. is it the same?
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 11:48 AM
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^^That I don't know. I'll look into it though. Never had to take one appart before...

I'm sure at least one of the other gearheads on here will know.

Don't be surprised if a mod moves your question to the brakes section as the DIY section is strictly for DIY instructions and not tech questions. Though your question is related to the original topic (brake caliper servicing).

Last edited by MPR; 07-Apr-2010 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 07-Apr-2010, 12:45 PM
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nice write up dude! way to go :up:
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Old 14-Apr-2010, 09:20 AM
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REPLACING YOUR CALIPER PISTON
Good Morning fellow import forum go'ers.
so last night i spent 3 hours removing cleaning and re lubricating my caliper piston, so that i can come to you this morning and give you a 45 min DIY version of how to replace you caliper piston.

my question is, do you know if there is like a bladder behind that piston to hold the brake fluid.
Turns out no, there is no bladder to hold the fluid.

What you will need.
- some shop rags
- wrench of some sort to get the tires and other bolts out.
- a bucket
- some kind of lubrication, or grease if you will.
- DOT 3 blake fluid.

1. remove wheel and brake pads as if you where changing the brake pads.
2. this will reveal the caliper piston.
3. There is a few ways you can do this next part.
- One is that you take the caliper right off the car and use compressed air to blow the piston out of its socket. (**** if you choose this way be sure to keep your hands away from the piston and the caliper, its going to shoot out, i recommend putting a piece of wood in there so that the piston isn't damaged from the force of hitting the other side of the caliper.** this is the way that i read up to do it online. but i found my way to be much less of a hassle, or dangerous.)
- the other way you could do it is to place the bucket under the bleed pin on the caliper and take it out completely, then you should be able to pull the piston out with your hands. or leave the bleed pin in and just push down on your brakes until you see the piston coming out then pull it out with your hands.
4. after this is done the extra brake fluid in the socket or chamber will drain out into your bucket.
5. Go ahead now and clean up you piston, using a rag to clean up the outside surface of the piston. and when you are done with your finger apply a small layer or grease over the newly cleaned surface.
6. now you will put the piston back in the socket. no need for tools you should just be able to "massage" it in without tools.
***Don't forget to put the dust boot back on. if you did, you should be able to still just pull out the piston with your hands.
7. put the bleed pin back in.
8. re-assemble your brakes. Ie. put the brake pads back on and put the caliper back over them.
9. you will need a friend for this part. because now you need to get all of the air out of the brake line.
a) top up your brake fluid using DOT 3 brake fluid (this is what i used for my 01 civic yours might be different)
b) have the bleed valve open and tell your friend to push the brakes to the floor. and to continue doing so until you tell him to stop and hold it to the floor, because you see fluid coming out of the bleed valve.
c) close the valve and tell your friend release the brake and try to push it to the floor and hold it there. when he has open the valve and some air should come out.
d) repeat step "c)" until the brakes seem firm again.
e) tighten the valve completely and then top up the brake fluid again. and it should be good to go.

10. if your confident that your brakes feel normal, go for a easy test drive, and if they seem fine then the job is done. if they don't then double check your work, tighten every valve and bolt, check your brake fluid levels, and if everything seems to be normal but still doesn't seem right i suggest taking it to a mechanic and have them fix it.

but if it does work then you might have just saved yourself some good money by not having to get your dealership to change the piston for you.

Thanks for reading. and i hope it all works out for you
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Old 14-Apr-2010, 09:22 AM
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thanks for the write up !
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