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Quick question about the law

Old 06-Mar-2008, 09:55 PM
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Quick question about the law

Ok so i've tried to look everywhere to find what the legal DB for a muffler is for the city or york region and toronto. NO i don't have a fart can on my car or anything stupid like that. I have a greddy evo catback (unless this is consider a fart can lol) and i got pulled over for it being to loud. So if someone here could tell me what the Legal DB is that would be great.

Thanks

David
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Old 06-Mar-2008, 11:22 PM
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Transport Canada mandates the maximum dB limits for new cars, trucks and motorcycles sold in Canada. 80 dB for cars, 82 dB for bikes, 84 dB for big trucks. If your muffler falls below these limits, you should generally be ok, with a "but" that I'll get into in a bit.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/acts-regulations...0/mvsrv.1.html

Ontario is currently working on modifying the HTA to prohibit installing after-market exhaust systems that increase exhaust noise noticeably above stock levels. It's not here yet, but it will come soon enough.

Even without that law, you can still be charged with unnecessary noise for having a muffler that does not properly muffle your exhaust noise. Some muffler types are even specifically banned under the HTA.

Even among non-banned muffler types, there is no such thing as a muffler that is "legal" for use on all types of cars. A muffler that might give good sound control on one type of car or truck might not do the same for another kind of vehicle. If so, you're open for HTA charges of unnecessary noise and/or improper muffler.

The key phrases used in the HTA are "nor shall the driver at any time cause the motor vehicle to make any unnecessary noise," and "equipped with a muffler in good working order and in constant operation to prevent excessive or unusual noise and excessive smoke, and no person shall use a muffler cut-out, straight exhaust, gutted muffler, hollywood muffler, by-pass or similar device".

Having said all that, there is no maximum dB limit specified as being legal on Ontario streets. It all depends on context.

If you are revving your car even below the 80 dB Transport Canada limit and even with a stock muffler through residential streets at night or by a hospital or retirement home at any time of day or night, you can still be charged with unnecessary noise under the HTA. You could also be charged under city or town noise bylaws.

The key word in the HTA is "unnecessary". Is it necessary for you to make that amount of noise to drive down the street?

Last edited by FiveO; 06-Mar-2008 at 11:35 PM.
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Old 07-Mar-2008, 02:05 AM
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Old 07-Mar-2008, 02:19 AM
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Originally Posted by FiveO View Post
Transport Canada mandates the maximum dB limits for new cars, trucks and motorcycles sold in Canada. 80 dB for cars, 82 dB for bikes, 84 dB for big trucks. If your muffler falls below these limits, you should generally be ok, with a "but" that I'll get into in a bit.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/acts-regulations...0/mvsrv.1.html

Ontario is currently working on modifying the HTA to prohibit installing after-market exhaust systems that increase exhaust noise noticeably above stock levels. It's not here yet, but it will come soon enough.

Even without that law, you can still be charged with unnecessary noise for having a muffler that does not properly muffle your exhaust noise. Some muffler types are even specifically banned under the HTA.

Even among non-banned muffler types, there is no such thing as a muffler that is "legal" for use on all types of cars. A muffler that might give good sound control on one type of car or truck might not do the same for another kind of vehicle. If so, you're open for HTA charges of unnecessary noise and/or improper muffler.

The key phrases used in the HTA are "nor shall the driver at any time cause the motor vehicle to make any unnecessary noise," and "equipped with a muffler in good working order and in constant operation to prevent excessive or unusual noise and excessive smoke, and no person shall use a muffler cut-out, straight exhaust, gutted muffler, hollywood muffler, by-pass or similar device".

Having said all that, there is no maximum dB limit specified as being legal on Ontario streets. It all depends on context.

If you are revving your car even below the 80 dB Transport Canada limit and even with a stock muffler through residential streets at night or by a hospital or retirement home at any time of day or night, you can still be charged with unnecessary noise under the HTA. You could also be charged under city or town noise bylaws.

The key word in the HTA is "unnecessary". Is it necessary for you to make that amount of noise to drive down the street?

this is very true. but i am wondering isnt a federal law over rule a provincial one?
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Old 07-Mar-2008, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Team Rukus View Post
this is very true. but i am wondering isnt a federal law over rule a provincial one?
It depends on what you mean by "overrule".

Federal law takes precedence over provincial law only in the sense that if federal law says a given act is illegal, the provinces can't then enact their own law making that same given act legal.

Federal law merely sets a minimum requirement. Provinces can add their own restrictions over and above federal law.

Dangerous driving under the CC is one example. The feds set a definition for for criminally dangerous operation of a vehicle, but just because your driving manages to fall short that definition doesn't mean you are off the hook. You can be charged under provincial traffic laws for acts well short of the CC definition of dangerous driving. Careless driving is the closest example, at least until racing/stunting parts of Bill 203 came into effect.

Ontario's standards for impaired driving are another example. Federal law sets .08 as the point at which criminal impairment occurs and where driving a vehicle is prohibited anywhere in Canada. Cross that line and you can face criminal charges. Ontario has gone that one step further and set its impairment line at .05. You won't get charged criminally between .05 and .08, but you will have your license suspended for 12 hours. under Bill 203 provisions that will take effect in the very near future, that will change to 72 hours suspension for first offence, 10 days for second, and 30 days for each time after.
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Old 07-Mar-2008, 12:36 PM
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oh so i guess i should change that **** and not get a new one haha ok cool thanks
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